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Not Your Usual Festival: Saga Fest – a Preview

Reviews

Not Your Usual Festival: Saga Fest – a Preview

Saga Fest poster.

Photo: Saga Fest.

Scott Shigeoka, the founder of a unique and wondrous festival called Saga Fest, arrived in Iceland with a vision “to connect people to each other, and to nature” via the means of storytelling.

And with that vision in mind he created a progressive festival based on the core values of sustainability, vulnerability, transformation and community building, in the hopes for everyone to step out of their comfort zone to contribute to a greater good.

Nearly 750 people will come together May 23-24 and unveil Saga Fest to the world, and themselves. Visitors can either set up a tent and experience the tribal feeling live all weekend long, or rent a room nearby. Of course, Iceland’s weather will be unpredictable as per usual, so better prepare for all outcomes.

This unique event will take place in Iceland’s countryside near Selfoss, at a farm called Stokkseyrarsel which has been working closely together with the Saga community in trying to realize a project of authentic connections and expressions.

The integrity of Saga Fests’ values is wide-reaching. Their entry ticket contains seeds which are meant to be planted in the ground upon arrival and will hopefully one day grow into a tree (Iceland could use a few more). Or if people ever feel like warming up over a cup of tea, one can simply sit under a life-sized replica tree and consciously connect with others and listen to a sound score while their tea is brewing.

One of the first events on the schedule will be a guided Modern Meditation to ground the spirit and reenergize the heart. However, it’s important to point out that their intention is not to merely create a weekend of intangible and overflowing hopes and wishes for the world, but hands-on experiences with long lasting outcomes. Saga Fest-goers will have the chance to heal through sounds, dance in the dark, design their own skateboards, participate in Icelandic Shamanism, Acro Yoga, life-sized puppet-making and poetry reading; all creative means to help express the inner self and people’s stories—therefore hopefully sharing the vulnerability we all have with the community.

Besides workshops, the Saga Team hopes for everyone to dance until the morning in a self-built dome, led by life musicians from 17 local and international artists, including Sisý Ey, Ylja, Soffía Björg and Robot Koch (Germany). However, everyone is welcome to BYOI (bring your own instruments), yet again the emphasis is on creating something beautiful together that connects the greater community; whether through music, art, storytelling, etc. The means are endless.

“Ultimately, Saga Fest is about planting seeds of change. Our goal is to ensure all participants leave with a burning desire to live more sustainably and to effect positive change in their communities,” Scott says.

I’m personally amazed by what Scott and the Saga Fest team have created, and can’t wait to take part in it. So come and join this promising life-changing weekend. See you there!

For more information visit: www.sagafest.is or www.facebook.com/SagaFest. And for ticket sales: www.midi.is.

Katharina Celeste, a German/American life enthusiast, has been living in Iceland for about two years; spending her days working as a waitress, modeling for artists, writing, dancing, laughing and learning from life.

Katharina Celeste - katharina_wiesinger(at)yahoo.de

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