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History

Hrafnseyri við Arnarfjörð

Saga-Age Ramparts and Tunnel Identified

Remains of a structural wall and a short tunnel from the twelfth century, which are mentioned in the Sagas of the Icelanders, appear to have been found using geophysical surveying at Hrafnseyri, by Arnarfjörður in the West Fjords.

From Reykjavík.

Grave Dig Gives Window on Past

Following Iceland’s adoption of Christianity in around 1000 AD, it is believed a church was built on the present-day corner of Aðalstræti and Kirkjustræti in Reykjavík. 800 years’ worth of Reykjavík residents are buried in the graveyard, which is now being excavated.

Reykjavík

Reykjavík Wants to Preserve Archaeological Find

The City of Reykjavík’s environment and planning committee this week voted to call upon the city council to set up an advisory committee for the archaeological remains recently discovered by Lækjargata, and for the recently rediscovered 19th and 20th century harborside structures along...

Reykjavík Gay Pride

Viking Ship, no Nudity in Reykjavík Pride Parade

Icelandic pop singer Páll Óskar Hjálmtýsson will ‘sail’ on a Viking ship “for the Icelandic settlement queens” in this year’s Reykjavík Pride parade, which will take place on August 8. Páll Óskar also stated that there will be no “tits and asses” in this year’s parade.

Iceland's national costume

National Museum Collecting Memories of Gender Equality History

The National Museum of Iceland is set to collect artifacts and stories about gender equality in Iceland, from the latter half of the 20th century to today, as part of its commemoration of the 100 years of women’s suffrage in Iceland. The project coincides with, and compliments, the ongoing...

Protest, 26.05.15.

Mackerel Petition Fourth Most Popular in History

A petition known as Þjóðareign (‘national property’), which asks President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson to veto a mackerel quota bill proposed by Sigurður Ingi Jóhannesson, Minister of Fisheries and Agriculture, has gained over 47,000 signatures, making it the fourth most popular in Icelandic history...

A memorial about the 1615 Spanish killings in Hólmavík.

Killing of Basques Now Banned in West Fjords

A memorial dedicated to the 32 Basque whalers who were killed in the West Fjords in 1615 in what’s known as Iceland’s only mass murder was unveiled in Hólmavík, the West Fjords, on April 22, the last day of winter. At the occasion, West Fjords district commissioner Jónas Guðmundsson revoked the...

Seljalandsfoss waterfall, seen from across a field.

South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874.

Askja

Astronauts to Commemorate Moon Training in Iceland

Five astronauts and Neil Armstrong’s descendants will visit Iceland at the invitation of the Exploration Museum in Húsavík, Northeast Iceland, next summer to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the training for the moon landing in the Icelandic highlands in 1965 and 1967.

Could America Have Looked Like This?

Icelandic journalist Illugi Jökulsson has written an article about what could have happened, if the settlements established by Icelander Leifur Eiríksson in North America had been permanent and Nordic people had gone to other parts of Vinlandia.

Krafla

The Great Volcanoes: Krafla

Krafla in Northeast Iceland is one of Iceland’s most spectacular and active volcanoes. For nearly a decade the Krafla caldera and Krafla fissure swarm erupted on and off in the period 1975-84. The events were a striking repetition of what happened during the Mývatn fires in the 1720s.

Þingvellir Almannagjá

Old Royal Route Uncovered in Þingvellir

When road improvements of the so-called Konungsvegur (King’s Road) in Þingvellir National Park began last week, old paving stones appeared from underneath the asphalt. These are likely the remains of the original King’s Road from 1907.

Askja eruption 1961

Photos of 1961 Askja Eruption Shown for First Time

On October 26, 1961, the Askja volcano suddenly started erupting. Even though the volcano had brought misery to the nation a hundred years earlier, not many were afraid this time. Now more than half a century later the public sees the photos taken on the journey by a father and son, Reynir and...

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